FaceBook

BG Converters

Diabetes Calculators
Blood Glucose equals

A1c to Avg. BG equals

Recent Topics / Posts

Temp Converter

oF o

Author Topic: Making A Basic Pan Gravy  (Read 187 times)

Offline Skhilled

  • JR. MEMBER
  • *
  • Join Date: Dec 2017
  • Location: PA, USA
  • Posts: 37
  • Total likes: 89
  • Gender: Male
    • Show only replies by Skhilled
    • Docskillz
  • BG Tracker
  • Diabetes Type: None
  • Diagnosis Year: None
Making A Basic Pan Gravy
« on: December 15, 2017, 07:33:12 PM »
Here's an article that I've created some years ago for a recipe forum I had that is down now. But I do have plans to bring it back. ;)

Making gravy is easy. The biggest decision you'll have to make is what kind of gravy. The most basic gravies are cream (using milk, cream, etc.), vegetable (using onion, carrots, etc.), and brown (normally uses meats). As their name implies, you'll be using those ingredients to make the type of gravy you prefer. The exception is brown which only uses the drippings or fond left behind from the meat you have cooked. Meat or veggies are not necessary but will greatly increase the flavor of the gravy. You can also make other kinds such as turkey or chicken and even something as elaborate as cider gravy. Combining different things like sausage and onion to make a more complex gravy.

Gravies are made of 3 basic ingredients: fat (butter, oil, fat from meats, etc.), thickener (flour, arrowroot or cornstarch), and a liquid (water, chick/beef stock or broth, apple juice/cider, etc.) The best gravies start by searing or frying meats, onions, etc. and then using the fond (brown bits that are left in the pan) as your flavor base. If you want turkey giblet gravy for Thanksgiving, for example, you'll need to cook turkey necks, backs, etc. until they release their juices and cook them until they are browned. Remove the meat to a bowl or plate and build your gravy from the fat and fond that is left in the pan. After the gravy is almost finished, you can then return the meat and any juices that have pooled in the bowl or plate to further enhance the flavor.

That being said, the basic recipe is:
1 tablespoon fat
1 tablespoon thickener
1 cup of liquid

For example, to make 3 cups of gravy you'll need:
3 tablespoon fat
3 tablespoon thickener
3 cup of liquid

To make the gravy you'll:
1.  Cook the meat, veggies, etc. on medium or medium-high heat until browned and brown bits (fond) are left in the pan. Using a metal pan and NOT a non-stick will work best! You MUST let the fond become a paper brown bag color for the best flavor. Do NOT burn the fond. If you do, you will need to start over or it will have a burnt taste.

You can also use a roaster pan for roasting a turkey, for instance. After the turkey is finished cooking in the oven, use the roaster pan instead of a frying pan on top of the stove on the burners and continue. ;)

2.  Remove the meat/veggies from the pan and set aside on a plate or in a bowl. Put a foil tent over it.

3.  Drain off enough fat from the pan so it leaves enough to make the desired amount you'll need. If you want to make one cup of gravy then leave one tablespoon of fat in the pan. If you do not have enough fat in the pan you can always add butter, etc. until you have enough fat for the amount you'll need.

4.  While stirring with a wooden spoon or wire whisk, add the desired amount of thickener (flour, etc.). For lump-free gravies use a whisk. Stir constantly until the thickener is smooth and you get the desired color for the gravy you are making. Cream or sausage gravies are normally an off white color. Cook those for a few minutes...just enough of it. For other gravies cook and stir until you get the desired color. The longer you cook it the richer the flavor will become.

5.  Slowly whisk/stir in your liquid(s). This is the part where you can leave it lumpy or make it lump-free. On medium heat, stir until it comes to a boil. Once it boils, this is about as thick as it will get when hot or warm. Gravies will always thicken as they cool but if you heat them up again they will not be a s thick.

6.  Turn the heat down until it simmers. You may add herbs and spices if you wish. You may also reduce it to thicken and make it taste richer, if you prefer. If the sauce appears too thick just add more liquid, a little at a time. Simmer for about 10-15 minutes.

7.  Return the meats, veggies, etc., as well as any accumulated juices to the pan and simmer for another 5 minutes to mix the flavors together.

8.  Salt and pepper to taste. That's all there is to it!

Here's a list of the ingredients that you can use to make gravies. Please know that this is not a complete list but it will give you great ideas on what kinds you can make.

Fats (You may combine these if there is not enough or to create more complex flavors):
Butter - the most common
Fats  - from whatever meats you have cooked.
Oils

Thickeners:
Flour - the most common but if not cooked long enough will taste like flour.
Cornstarch - better but must be mixed with a small amount of water first then add to the fat.
Arrowroot - sometimes hard to find but also very good.

Liquids:
Water - the most common but flavorless.
Broths and stocks - meat, poultry, or vegetable.
Juices - use of very light juices like apple is highly recommended

Tips:
You can add all kinds of herbs and spices as well as other things like worcestershire sauce, garlic, liquid smoke, balsamic vinegar, etc. The list is endless.

Don't crowd the pan when cooking meats or veggies. If necessary, cook in batches.

Enjoy!

Offline Shanny

  • MODERATOR
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2016
  • Location: USA, Missouri Ozarks
  • Posts: 1,706
  • Total likes: 5182
  • Gender: Female
    • Show only replies by Shanny
  • BG Tracker
  • Diabetes Type: 2
  • Diagnosis Year: 2009
Re: Making A Basic Pan Gravy
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2017, 07:42:22 PM »
Very good points for making gravy. But here on a diabetes forum, we opt for thickening by reduction - not carb-loaded products like grains or root crops.

Offline Skhilled

  • JR. MEMBER
  • *
  • Join Date: Dec 2017
  • Location: PA, USA
  • Posts: 37
  • Total likes: 89
  • Gender: Male
    • Show only replies by Skhilled
    • Docskillz
  • BG Tracker
  • Diabetes Type: None
  • Diagnosis Year: None
Re: Making A Basic Pan Gravy
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2017, 07:50:37 PM »
I was wondering about the types of flours. I know you can use some and you can sub any kind of ground grains to make your own flour to use in recipes such as almond meal, coconut flour, flax meal, etc. if it is within your diet. Bob's Red Mill also has a paleo flour.

Offline Shanny

  • MODERATOR
  • *
  • Join Date: Mar 2016
  • Location: USA, Missouri Ozarks
  • Posts: 1,706
  • Total likes: 5182
  • Gender: Female
    • Show only replies by Shanny
  • BG Tracker
  • Diabetes Type: 2
  • Diagnosis Year: 2009
Re: Making A Basic Pan Gravy
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2017, 08:03:56 PM »
Some of us are experienced cooks - some even with professional experience - and however we can reduce the carbohydrate content of our foods is our ultimate goal. Reduction still works better without introducing additional carbs.

The purpose of creating this forum was to assist patients with diabetes in maximizing the LCHF way-of-eating. We don't welcome suggestions on how to sneak in carbs. We're dedicated to doing WITHOUT carbs.

Offline Skhilled

  • JR. MEMBER
  • *
  • Join Date: Dec 2017
  • Location: PA, USA
  • Posts: 37
  • Total likes: 89
  • Gender: Male
    • Show only replies by Skhilled
    • Docskillz
  • BG Tracker
  • Diabetes Type: None
  • Diagnosis Year: None
Re: Making A Basic Pan Gravy
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2017, 08:11:36 PM »
Agreed. I wasn't trying to do that at all. This is a learning process for me. Reduction is the best method.